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 »  Home  »  Dental Implant 2  »  A Survey Of Clinical Members Of The Association Of Dental Implantology in the United Kingdom. Part II. The Use Of Augmentation Materials In Dental Implant Surgery
A Survey Of Clinical Members Of The Association Of Dental Implantology in the United Kingdom. Part II. The Use Of Augmentation Materials In Dental Implant Surgery
Introduction - Materials and methods.

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M. P. J. Young, BDS
P. Sloan, BDS, PhD, FRCPath, FDSRCS(Eng)
A. A. Quayle, LDS, FDSRCS(Eng), PhD
D. H. Carter, BSc, MPhil, PhD
Units of Oral Surgery and Oral Pathology, Turner Dental School and Hospital, University of Manchester, Manchester, England, UK.

In the absence of systematic review and comparative randomized controlled trials, opinion remains divided over which materials and techniques are most effective for bone augmentation in oral implantology. It is generally accepted that an autograft constitutes the ideal augmentation material, and it has a long history of use However, a variety of other materials are used in this context, and these can be divided into the following three categories: allografts, either as fresh frozen bone or demineralized freeze-dried bone (DFDB), xenografts, and synthetic materials or alloplasts. Considerable research effort is directed toward the development of these materials because their use might obviate or minimize the need for second-site bone harvesting. The following are the objectives of Part II of the survey:
  1. to determine which augmentation materials were used by respondents,
  2. to elicit which factors influenced the choice of augmentation materials,
  3. to establish the perceived levels of evidence that support augmentation materials, and
  4. to ascertain the clinical applications of particulate augmentation materials by clinical members of the Association Of Dental Implantology (ADI) in the United Kingdom.
MATERIALS AND METHODS.
The questionnaire was designed by the authors and mailed to clinical members of the ADI in 1997. The data was collected between July 1998 and May 1999.